Three Ways To Find The Ideal Law Firm For Your Cerebral Palsy Case

When a parent hears that their child was diagnosed with cerebral palsy, the first question that comes to mind is “How did this happen!?” To find out how, the first thing parents need to do is research.  Second, parents need to consult with a lawyer that specializes in cerebral palsy cases.

What Is Cerebral Palsy?

The cause of cerebral palsy is brain malformation or a brain injury that happens while the brain is developing.  Cerebral palsy occurs before, during, or after birth, and it affects muscle coordination, muscle control, muscle tone, posture, balance, and reflex. Additionally, it may impact gross motor skills, fine motor skills, as well as oral motor functioning. Regardless, you need to know how and why this happened with the help of a lawyer.

Following are some things to consider when seeking out a law firm for your cerebral palsy case:


How long has the law firm been practicing? Do you know if they handle hard cases? These are often the questions you must ask yourself when finding a law firm. With over 20 years of experience, Gershon, Willoughby, Getz & Smith, LLC has represented a wide variety of clients with birth injury cases. With their background in medical, they are the perfect law firm to choose for your case.


There is no denying that you should be consulting with a firm that has a flawless reputation and great credentials. Have they successfully won several cases?  Any parent seeking a law firm that concentrates in birth injuries should contact Gershon, Willoughby, Getz & Smith, LLC. Their attorneys were rated “AV” by their legal peers.


You should find out what kind of degrees or background your lawyers possess. Do they concentrate in medical law? Gershon, Willoughby, Getz & Smith, LLC have an advantage because their lawyers have both legal and medical degrees. Parents should be consulting with medical professionals that specialize in comprehending medical negligence and can fully access your case.

If you need to seek justice for your child, choose Gershon, Willoughby, Getz & Smith, LLC as your cerebral palsy law firm to fight for your child’s rights. Their team of lawyers possesses legal and medical degrees, and will also assist others with permanent and serious injuries caused by medical mistakes.

Seek legal advice as well as justice for your child today.  Contact them at 1-877-292-6491.

Kindergarteners Learn of Boy’s Cerebral Palsy Journey

Rather than have kids in his kindergarten stare at her son, Vanessa Steinman – mother to 5-year old River Steinman who has cerebral palsy – decided to educate them. With this in mind, Vanessa made a picture book about her son and took it to Parkway Elementary in St. Joseph, Missouri to show his classmates. “I just wanted the kids to see that he’s just like them.”

River uses bright blue crutches and a walker to get around. This is because the type of cerebral palsy he has – spastic diplegia – affects his ability to walk. He also uses a special chair that has arm rests in class. When everyone else is sitting in a circle on the floor, River sits on a blue chair with his feet on a small container.

The picture book explained parts of the condition to River’s class. Teacher May Boehner read from the book “his brain sends the wrong message to his body.” Also in the book are pictures about River’s hobbies, his favorite colors, and his first surgery. It was actually exciting for kids in River’s class to hear about the tap dance lessons, horse riding, daily struggles as well as week-long trips River takes to St. Louis for appointments with the doctor. The book also tells how he wasn’t diagnosed until aged 2 and then a year later he had surgery that enabled him to walk, with help. Today, he is often seen walking around the school.

His mother is very proud of him. “River has no limitations, according to River,” she said. And she’s not the only one. Parkway’s paraprofessional, Colynn Chesney, says “He’s fantastic. He brightens my day. Every day I walk in and he just smiles.” She believes the book will help “with diversity. Different kids face different challenges, and these kids are very understanding.”

After 14 Years Together, Boy with CP and Caretaker Continue Their Special Bond

Fourteen years ago Renee Laporte was a paramedic looking for a part-time job to fill in the hours of her split-shift. Answering an advertisement she saw to be a classroom aid for a kindergarten boy with cerebral palsy, Laporte has never looked back.

She applied to the Edmonton Catholic School Board for the position.

“They told me we have this little boy with cerebral palsy who chokes and has seizures — and that’s all they told me,” says Renee. “I said, ‘Absolutely, I would love to.’”

In January 2000 Nathan Devlin was attending the Holy Family School’s kindergarten in Mill Woods, Edmonton, Canada, when he first met Laporte, who would be his aid, caretaker, and friend for the next 14 years.

During the first trimester of Nathan’s gestation during his mother’s pregnancy with him, Nathan’s brain ceased its development. The label for this illness is ‘brain migration.’ As a result Nathan cannot speak, and must be tube-fed. But that did not stop Nathan from attending school, and with the help of Laporte, receiving his certificate of completion, the equivalent of a Grade 12 diploma.

Laporte, who is now 36, works five days a week with Nathan. She begins each day at 7:30am and finishes at 5pm. She gets Nathan out of bed, washed and dressed, and ready for each new day.

Laporte says that Nathan’s IQ was never tested. But he can solve problems and he has finished many of his school assignments.

“He understands everything that is said to him and interacts with his friends,” says Laporte.

Now that Nathan is 20 his ambition is to attend the fine arts program at MacEwan University.

Laporte is a devout Christian, “something I’m very proud of,” she says.

“This is my purpose; this is what I’m supposed to do,” says Laporte. “And why I say that is because this isn’t what I was planning to do. So I know God put it in my life.”

Raising Money for Surgery

Imogen Kelly, 4, has cerebral palsy and her family is trying to help her to have a surgery that would cut the damaged nerves in her spinal cord and allow her to walk. So far they have raised £6,000 of the £28,000 they need for the operation. Her mom, Sarah Rogers, launched Imogen’s Wish to make it happen.

Most recently, the Sunshine Day Nursery at Dene House Children’s Center where Imogen is a student, held an event. The fundraiser involved a raffle, a cake sale and more. Other events that the family has had include a battle of the bands, cake sales, coffee mornings and walks, bungee jumps in Imogen’s name and more.

As Sarah said, “All the community has pulled together and that many people have had bag packs and cake sales, the police come down to the sponsored walk, and it just shows how good Peterlee is. We’ve made lots of new friends too.”

Those interested can go to a Facebook page that Sarah has set up to see how the fundraising efforts are going. The page is at