This is What It’s Really Like Caring for a Child with Cerebral Palsy

Every year, 10,000 babies are born with cerebral palsy, making it the most common neurological disorder in the nation. Cerebral palsy is a lifelong, non-progressive disorder that affects a person’s ability to control his or her movement, as well as maintain good posture and balance. According to Cerebralpalsyguide.com, because of the added strain on the body throughout the child’s life, adults use five times the amount of energy as an average person, just to walk or move about freely. A day in the life of a person growing up with cerebral palsy will be faced with increased pain, stiff muscles, slip and falls, loss of independence, fatigue, amongst many more troublesome symptoms.

Although some children are born with the genetic abnormalities associated with cerebral palsy, in some cases, children will acquire the disorder due to a birth injury. At Gershon, Willoughby, Getz & Smith, LLC, we are the choice cerebral palsy attorneys for so many because many of our attorneys are also medical doctors. Our team is skilled at “reading between the line” and interpreting complicated medical paperwork, that only an experienced doctor would understand. If, as a parent, you suspect your child has suffered a birth injury resulting in cerebral palsy, we can get you the compensation you deserve.

As this may all be new to you, this is what it’s really like caring for a child with cerebral palsy.

First and foremost, as parents, nothing can prepare you for the lifelong journey ahead of you while you raise a child with special needs. In just six short months after birth, the child will start to show the early warning signs of cerebral palsy. This might include the head lagging backward as you pick your little one up, an extremely stiff or relaxed body, or unusual posture and a favoring to one side of the body. The child won’t reach milestones typical for his or her age like crawling, talking, or walking. Instead, your child will need extra support with all of these things.

As the child starts to grow, the condition will sometimes leave him or her with an intellectual impairment, such as the need to be placed in a special program at school. In moderate to severe cases of cerebral palsy, children will experience delayed growth and development due to the muscle and limbs that have been affected. What’s more, over time speech and language disorders can develop, which can be frustrating not only for the child, but for the parent watching the baby suffer. Cerebral palsy does not go away, but the sooner disabilities are managed through physical, occupational, and speech therapy, the better chance the child has enjoying an independent and healthy adult life. This is a lifelong journey and commitment for the whole family.

As you can see, caring for a child with cerebral palsy takes a lot of heart, patience, time, and not to mention money, for something that could have been prevented at birth. If you want justice for your child, contact our lawyers for cerebral palsy today and we’ll set up a meeting to assess your case immediately.

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